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Higher Education Is a Public Good | Opening Day of SCUP–48, Cultivating Integration in Planning for Higher Education

You're missing out on a great conference. As one attendee just said to me:

"In five years of attending higher education conferences I have never seen two better keynotes."

P.S. The photo archives are here.

After a day and a half of committee meetings, preconference workshops, Planning author roundtables, and more, conference chair David Cox of the University of Memphis (by the magic of video) arrived instantaneously in San Diego via student-invented transporter device to the tune of Thus Spake Zarathustra—despite travel restrictions—to open the conference.

 

Prior to the opening plenary address by former US Labor Secretary Robert Reich, the recipients of two of SCUP's most prestigious awards were recognized:

SCUP's 2013 K. C. Parsons Founders Award for Distinguished Achievement in Higher Education Planning

Julie Slark was awarded SCUP's 2013 K. C. Parsons Founders Award for Distinguished Achievement in Higher Education Planning. Slark is the retired assistant vice chancellor for Educational Services at Rancho Santiago Community College District in California.

SCUP 2013 Distinguished Service Award recipient is Persis Rickes of Rickes Associates. Rickes is a prolific SCUP presenter, author, and has held numerous volunteer leadership roles at every level of the organization.


Robert Reich's address was titled "Higher Education Is a Public Good."

SCUP Pubs staffer Shaunna Cahill captured the following quotes from Reich's address. My favorite:

We have the collective wealth to provide every child with a high quality education. If we do so it will be a matter of our political will.

The economy cannot help but influence what our students aspire to.


Globalization is more interesting and more subtle than you might think.

The standard of living of a people depends not on having a company HQ nearby but by the value they add to the increasingly integrated global system of production.

Our competitors are not low-wage workers but those adding high value.

A fast-aging society will require immigration of young (poor, uneducated) workers to support itself.

Institutional responses to competitive rankings a la US News are driving costs way up and need to be controlled.

It is cruel and unusual to assume that every child, to be a success, must go through a four-year college experience.
---We need to creatively develop alternative possibilities, and no one institution can do this—we need to craft them together through a group like SCUP.

We've got to be better explainers and educators about what we do and the purpose of higher education.

We planners understand higher education as a public good and we need to SELL it as such.

We need to educate the nation that there are a number of criteria to indicate institutional success, not just one list at a newspaper. Maybe SCUP can take a stab at identifying more meaningful criteria.

I am not a class warrior, but a class worrier. 

We hid our lack of aggregate demand behind borrowing.

-Terry Calhoun

 

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Comment by Irene Graff on July 29, 2013 at 3:02pm

Thank you!  This is great for those of us unable to attend. 

Also good to follow the #SCUP48 backchannel on Twitter.

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