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Calendar of Events

May 7, 2014

SCUP Webinar
Campus Landscaping: Impact on Recruitment and Retention

May 20, 2014 | Winston-Salem State University | Winston-Salem, NC

SCUP 2014 Southern Symposium
Executing Campus Master Plans in Times of Shrinking Resources

May 23, 2014 | University of Calgary | Calgary, Alberta, (Canada)

SCUP 2014 Pacific Symposium
Higher Education Innovation in Challenging Times—An Integrated Approach

June 13, 2014 | George Mason University | Fairfax, VA
SCUP 2014 Mid-Atlantic Regional Symposium
Learning Spaces Workshop – Mason’s New Exploratory Hall Learning Spaces

July 12–16, 2014 | David L. Lawrence Convention Center | Pittsburgh, PA

Become a member of SCUP and enjoy full access to resources for bringing the best integrated planning to your campus.  Membership dues help support community resources like the Mojo, and advance SCUP's vision of being the premier organization for the advancement of integrated planning in higher education.  Thank you for your support!

. . . "Where else could I find an organization that brings together strategy, process, and application techniques for higher education planning? At its core, SCUP is an "integrated" community of experts, constantly sharing knowledge that has been tested"

Joseph T. Isaac, President, African Methodist Episcopal University

The SCUP Scan for August 26–31, 2013 v26n36

Subscribe to the email version of The SCUP Scan.

The Call for Proposals for SCUP–49 in Pittsburgh next July is October 1—Plan for Transformation. Don't delay getting started on your proposal.

FEATURED OBSERVATIONS

Clayton Christensen “In 15 years from now half of US universities may be in bankruptcy … in the end I’m excited to see that happen. So pray for Harvard Business School if you wouldn’t mind.” The eager receptivity to his comments in the 30-minute video is something to see.


The Plight of Small Colleges— In "Turnaround President Makes the Most of His College's Size," Scott Carlson profiles Davis & Elkins College president G.T. "Buck" Smith: "Here, at 74 years old, taking no salary, he is trying to save a tiny, debt-ridden college in one of the poorest states in the country. His strategy is so simple and earnest, it may sound naïve to the jaded."

Get Your $6,600 CompSci Master's Here!Tony Bates recently noted that until top institutions begin putting a diploma behind their MOOCs, “we have to believe that they think that this is a second class form of education suitable only for the unwashed masses.” Well, Georgia Institute of Technology is planning to bring on line a "new master’s degree in computer science, delivered through a series of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, for $6,600." ... [I]n a few years, Georgia Tech believes that thousands of students from all over the world will enroll in the new program."


SCANNING LINKS

Their TV screens keep getting smaller as their parents’ screens grow ever larger. For this year's new students, born in 1995 ... . Yep, it's the newest Beloit Mindset List. An obligatory autumn read.

Enrollment Disruption? Christina Allen, LinkedIn's director of product management, says "the idea for the pages came after she saw her daughter and others struggle to find usable information on colleges. 'I knew that hidden in millions of member profiles were powerful insights about the career outcomes of educations from universities around the world.'"

Colleges Revamp Welcome Centers The new Inside Higher Ed "Inside Look" series provides a series of "what's new" in important campus space categories, including great images and "who did it" information. Other Inside Look" reports include Inside Look: Student Centers, Inside Look: Learning Spaces, and Inside Look: Residence Halls.

Pew Internet & American Life Project: Infographics The Pew Internet & American Life Project has compiled these infographics for use by, among others, planners. They can come in handy when scanning the environment. "These visualizations represent the fruits of their substantial research into topics such as Internet usage, cell phone ownership, and social media."

Competency-Based Transcripts at NAU "Northern Arizona’s first crack at a transcript grounded in competencies gives an early glimpse of how credentialing in higher education might be shifting, experts said. And while the competency reports could be improved, some said, the university also deserves credit (no pun intended) for attempting to better-define what students do to earn their degrees."

More on the [Common] Core [Curriculum] "From a higher education perspective, new 'Common Core' standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates and close education gaps in and between states."

The Gates of Harvard Yard is now a Nieman Foundation for Journalism e-book; its first such publication. Many SCUPers will love it, especially the 360° panoramas.

MOJO

This week in the Mojo, and this newsletter, we focus on transformation and disruption, as we release SCUP's newest book, Transforming in an Age of DisruptionIt is available for no fee only through Thursday, August 30. After that time, nonmembers will be required to purchase it. A new companion book, Excellence on the Edge is bundled with it. Get two new visionary, inspiring and, yes, practical books in a single download.

IN-DEPTH

Clayton Christensen “In 15 years from now half of US universities may be in bankruptcy … in the end I’m excited to see that happen. So pray for Harvard Business School if you wouldn’t mind.” The receptivity to his comments in the 30-minute video at right is something to see.

He talked about how for centuries education had “no technological core” (meaning it was bound by physical locations) and thus disruption was very difficult. Obviously that barrier has been brought down with low-cost ability to capture, stream and distribute content over the Internet.

Today’s higher education is responding by making more courses online and available to people outside of physical boundaries.

But while universities are developing online content they are not fundamentally disrupting leaning because the method of delivery is not a new business model. “Online education is truly going to kill us.” He talked about the need to have content delivered closer to those in the work force who could immediately apply what they’re taught and then immediately be back in the classroom to discuss the implementation.

The Plight of Small Colleges— In "Turnaround President Makes the Most of His College's Size," Scott Carlson profiles Davis & Elkins College president G.T. "Buck" Smith: "Here, at 74 years old, taking no salary, he is trying to save a tiny, debt-ridden college in one of the poorest states in the country. His strategy is so simple and earnest, it may sound naïve to the jaded."

John C. Nelson, an analyst with Moody's Investors Service who oversees its coverage of the higher-education sector, says that while small colleges have always been pressured, they usually do not disappear, because wealthy board members or alumni find ways to sustain them.

"Whether the economy now changes that is an unknown," he says. If the stock market does not improve, if unemployment continues at 10 percent, "I think you will see some of these very small colleges closing."

Those that survive, both he and Mr. Ekman say, will have a clear sense of purpose, a marketable niche, a reputation for high quality, and at the foundation, a good leader.

From the same issue of The ChronicleEnrollment Woes Push Small Colleges to Be Strategic, by by Eric Hoover: "The dynamics that are reshaping higher education pose challenges for small tuition-dependent colleges. But some are finding ways to thrive."

Get Your $6,600 CompSci Master's Here!Tony Bates recently noted that until top institutions begin putting a diploma behind their MOOCs, “we have to believe that they think that this is a second class form of education suitable only for the unwashed masses.” Well, Georgia Institute of Technology is planning to bring on line a "new master’s degree in computer science, delivered through a series of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, for $6,600." ... [I]n a few years, Georgia Tech believes that thousands of students from all over the world will enroll in the new program."

The $6,600 master’s degree marks an attempt to realize the tantalizing promise of the MOOC movement: a great education, scaled up to the point where it can be delivered for a rock-bottom price. Until now, the nation’s top universities have adopted a polite but distant approach toward MOOCs. The likes of Yale, Harvard, and Stanford have put many of their classes online for anyone to take, and for free. But there is no degree to be had, even for those who ace the courses. Education writer and consultant Tony Bates recently noted that until top institutions begin putting a diploma behind their MOOCs, “we have to believe that they think that this is a second class form of education suitable only for the unwashed masses.”

 

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